“Sticky Wings” vs “The Orange Buffalo”

"Sticky wings"
“Sticky wings”

I developed my obsession with chicken wings by going to America’s best joints like “Talde”, “Pok Pok” and local unique BBQ places. London disappointed me with the American-style food before: my favorite Boston cream tasted like sugar and sugar only; proper pancakes were as rare as a “good hair day” for Donald Trump; franchise wings – sprayed thoroughly with vinegar.

Sticky wings” happened to be a friendly, cozy establishment. Waitress was very attentive, beer cold and wings – they were heavenly. “Sticky wings BBQ” & “American buffalo” were my favorite. If you prefer mouth-on-fire-effect, go for “Hot chilli”. All the accessories vital for a chicken wings ritual were there: wet napkins, buckets for bones, condiments.

"The Orange Buffalo"
“The Orange Buffalo”

“The Orange Buffalo” was a one of the most popular truck spots in the hipster part of Shoreditch. The owners were very warm and welcoming, beer…wait, no beer?! Yes, indeed, I ate my wings with sweet soda – it’s very hard to get an alcohol license in Great Britain. Wings were very tasty: double fried crispy deliciousness with a unique sauce.

Curly french fries
Curly french fries

There were a number of available gradations on the hotness scale, but we chose the “Original”. Shortage of napkins – only two paper ones for a couple people with messy hands – was a bit inconvenient as well.

"The Orange Buffalo"
“The Orange Buffalo” wings

Well, choosing between two of them was not very hard. Both places have delicious chicken wings, but only one has got great customer service and a quality product. “Sticky wings” is our victor and the place to satisfy occasional cravings.

 

 

Georgian Food In London

– Let’s eat Georgian tonight!

– Well, I am not a big fan of American cuisine.

Georgia is carved into many brains as one of the U.S states – not a beautiful country between Eastern Europe and West Asia. Yet its culture, people and food are well worth to be on travellers’ radars.

It was my grandmother who introduced me to this wonderful food culture – the Russians were always attracted to those aromatic-spicy, dewy dishes. I got nostalgic and started my search of descent Georgian food in London.

There are a couple of places here – all of them with relatively good reviews. We chose the one in our area: when your belly is full of delicious food, try to minimise walking (not a health coach advice).Khachapuri

“Tamada” has it all: incredible homely atmosphere, genuine Georgian food, clean menu (not “The 200 Club” never – ending list), warm southern hospitality and great wine selection.

We conditionally divided the menu into two affordable dinners, where all dishes could be assessed. Here are the favourite items: “Adjaruli Khachapuri” – cheese-filled baked bread topped with eggs, “Lobio “- red beans with coriander & garlic, “Badrijani” – stuffed aubergines with onions, Georgian spices, garlic & walnuts. Try to order some traditional flat bread alone with you dishes and enjoy the culinary art of spreading and spooning them over.

There are a couple of things you should bear in mind if Georgian cuisine is terra incognita for you: walnuts – crashed, chopped, grounded, fried – and pomegranate are the key ingredients in almost every dish. Like other Transcaucasian cultures, the Georgians use open fire and spit for meat and vegetable preparation. Thus the smoky taste is present. There is no espresso or americano served – only Georgian sediment coffee (with grounds for fortune tellers).Georg. food

If you are hesitating between Turkish, Russian or Greek cuisine, try Georgian – it combines many of the Eastern European and Mediterranean flavours, and you will get an interesting gastronomic adventure.

-Let’s eat Georgian tonight!

– Khachapuri it is then.

 

“Tamada” restaurant: 122 Boundary Road, London, NW8 0RH.
Tel: 020 7372 2882